If you are having trouble viewing this message, see it in your browser.

megaphone

Temporary Lobby Restriction - UPDATE

Bank of Wisconsin Dells and its branches continue to monitor the current pandemic situation as it relates to our staff and customer's health and safety.  At this time, we will continue to operate with our limited access lobby.  Appointments to access lobby services can be made by calling 608-253-1111 to contact your personal banker, your lending representative, or a customer service representative.  We continue to encourage our customers when possible, to utilize any one of these convenient alternatives: drive-up, online banking, mobile banking, telebanc or our ATMs.

Please know that our customer and staff's health and safety are a top priority to the bank.  Bank of Wisconsin Dells remains a financially strong and secure bank, that takes great pride in serving the financial needs of the customers and communities we serve.  Thank you for choosing Bank of Wisconsin Dells for all your financial needs.

 

Economic Impact Payment (EIP) Prepaid Debit Cards

If you qualify for an Economic Impact Payment and have not received a check yet, the government might mail you your money on a prepaid VISA debit card issued by Meta Bank.

Starting the week of May 18th, approximately 4 million eligible recipients of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) will receive an EIP Card in the mail. The EIP Card is a Treasury-sponsored, VISA-branded, prepaid debit card that provides a safe, convenient and secure way for EIP recipients to access their Economic Impact Payments without having to go to a bank or credit union to cash a check.

Learn more

Customer Appreciation days are postponed until further notice. More information will follow once it becomes available. Thank you for your continued understanding.

Happy Anniversary Scott

Congratulations Class of 2020

Bank of Wisconsin Dells and its branches would like to extend a heartfelt congratulations to the 2020 graduating classes.  You have been through an extraordinary journey and we wish you continued success in the future.

We would also like to give a special congratulations to two of those graduating seniors who have been great additions to the BWD team. 


Lauren P. - Wisconsin Dells High School
Bank of Wisconsin Dells-Lake Delton Branch

 


Katelyn Z. - Portage High School
Community Bank of Portage

COVID-19 Exploited by Malicious Cyber Actors

This is a joint alert from the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the United Kingdom’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC).

Summary of Attacks

APT groups are using the COVID-19 pandemic as part of their cyber operations. These cyber threat actors will often masquerade as trusted entities. Their activity includes using coronavirus-themed phishing messages or malicious applications, often masquerading as trusted entities that may have been previously compromised. Their goals and targets are consistent with long-standing priorities such as espionage and “hack-and-leak” operations.

Cybercriminals are using the pandemic for commercial gain, deploying a variety of ransomware and other malware.

Both APT groups and cybercriminals are likely to continue to exploit the COVID-19 pandemic over the coming weeks and months. Threats observed include:

  • Phishing, using the subject of coronavirus or COVID-19 as a lure,
  • Malware distribution, using coronavirus- or COVID-19- themed lures,
  • Registration of new domain names containing wording related to coronavirus or COVID-19, and
  • Attacks against newly—and often rapidly—deployed remote access and teleworking infrastructure.

Malicious cyber actors rely on basic social engineering methods to entice a user to carry out a specific action. These actors are taking advantage of human traits such as curiosity and concern around the coronavirus pandemic in order to persuade potential victims to:

  • Click on a link or download an app that may lead to a phishing website, or the downloading of malware, including ransomware.
    • For example, a malicious Android app purports to provide a real-time coronavirus outbreak tracker but instead attempts to trick the user into providing administrative access to install "CovidLock" ransomware on their device.[1]
  • Open a file (such as an email attachment) that contains malware.
    • For example, email subject lines contain COVID-19-related phrases such as “Coronavirus Update” or “2019-nCov: Coronavirus outbreak in your city (Emergency)”

To create the impression of authenticity, malicious cyber actors may spoof sender information in an email to make it appear to come from a trustworthy source, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) or an individual with “Dr.” in their title. In several examples, actors send phishing emails that contain links to a fake email login page. Other emails purport to be from an organization’s human resources (HR) department and advise the employee to open the attachment.

Malicious file attachments containing malware payloads may be named with coronavirus- or COVID-19-related themes, such as “President discusses budget savings due to coronavirus with Cabinet.rtf.”

Phishing

CISA and NCSC have both observed a large volume of phishing campaigns that use the social engineering techniques described above.

Examples of phishing email subject lines include:

  • 2020 Coronavirus Updates,
  • Coronavirus Updates,
  • 2019-nCov: New confirmed cases in your City, and
  • 2019-nCov: Coronavirus outbreak in your city (Emergency).

These emails contain a call to action, encouraging the victim to visit a website that malicious cyber actors use for stealing valuable data, such as usernames and passwords, credit card information, and other personal information.

SMS Phishing

Most phishing attempts come by email but NCSC has observed some attempts to carry out phishing by other means, including text messages (SMS).

Historically, SMS phishing has often used financial incentives—including government payments and rebates (such as a tax rebate)—as part of the lure. Coronavirus-related phishing continues this financial theme, particularly in light of the economic impact of the epidemic and governments’ employment and financial support packages. For example, a series of SMS messages uses a UK government-themed lure to harvest email, address, name, and banking information. These SMS messages—purporting to be from “COVID” and “UKGOV” include a link directly to the phishing site.

Phishing guidance for individuals

The NCSC’s suspicious email guidance explains what to do if you've already clicked on a potentially malicious email, attachment, or link. It provides advice on who to contact if your account or device has been compromised and some of the mitigation steps you can take, such as changing your passwords. It also offers NCSC's top tips for spotting a phishing email:

  • Authority – Is the sender claiming to be from someone official (e.g., your bank or doctor, a lawyer, a government agency)? Criminals often pretend to be important people or organizations to trick you into doing what they want.
  • Urgency – Are you told you have a limited time to respond (e.g., in 24 hours or immediately)? Criminals often threaten you with fines or other negative consequences.
  • Emotion – Does the message make you panic, fearful, hopeful, or curious? Criminals often use threatening language, make false claims of support, or attempt to tease you into wanting to find out more.
  • Scarcity – Is the message offering something in short supply (e.g., concert tickets, money, or a cure for medical conditions)? Fear of missing out on a good deal or opportunity can make you respond quickly.

 

Here Are Some Resources For Information About Coronavirus Relief, Benefits, And More

These are tough and confusing times but there are many things happening to address your financial and physical health during the coronavirus crisis, including economic and benefits programs for individuals and businesses; health advice; federal, state and local guidelines; and much more. Take the time to learn how you can get help.

Read More

Member FDIC, Equal Housing Lender Like us on Facebook  


Bank of Wisconsin Dells
716 Superior Street
Wisconsin Dells, WI 53965